Tagged: death

On the Fear of Death

Today, hundreds of millions of men and women from most of the nations of the developed world have been herded into mass hysteria and precipitous panic over a virus outbreak that has proved to be no more ravaging than a bad flu season, an illness that is having its severest effects mostly among the small proportion of the population that is already at...

The Irony of Nihilism: Mortal Dread

One of the paradoxes of this age that has forfeited all belief in a reality beyond immediate sense perception, and all humanity beyond the material mechanism, is that people, though no longer believing they exist, have become hysterically obsessed with prolonging their “life” (i.e., their illusory appearance of self-moving unity) regardless of the cost. No price is too high to pay for a...

The Philosophical View

An enthusiastic and diligent student who has been studying Plato with me for several months — we were in the middle of a close analysis of Book III of the Republic several weeks ago, when coronavirus “social distancing” interrupted our conversation — sent me an e-mail yesterday to share his distress over the current situation. You know, students like me don’t know how...

When the Ugly Truth Just Isn’t Funny Anymore

Throughout these months of trumped-up mass hysteria over the Pandemic that Ate a Planet, the progressive paternalists and their slavish multitudes have masked the dishonorable motives behind their drive to lock down entire nations and shut down entire economies — power lust in the case of the paternalists, mortal fear for their own physical existence in that of the slaves — with one...

Thoughts on Death and Eternity

A few new thoughts on the current state of things, proffered to those visiting this site for the same reason I maintain it, namely as an increasingly rare port in an increasingly violent storm. In other words, these are thoughts for the happy few, we lonely and “socially-distanced” holdouts for reason and civility in a world gone stark raving mad. “We have to...

Limits Imposed and Removed

Jorge Luis Borges, one of my favorite modern writers, published two distinct but similar poems called “Limits,” dealing with roughly the same philosophical theme, namely the gradual narrowing of our remaining experience as we grow older. I wish to discuss the shorter of the two poems, which, although less well-known, is the one I prefer. I begin with Borges’ work itself, which I...

Uncle George Died Yesterday

I received an e-mail from one of my sisters this morning, informing me that my oldest living uncle died last night, “peacefully in his sleep.” Peacefully in one’s sleep seems like a good way to go. It lacks poignancy and drama, to be sure. But the poignant and dramatic death is, it seems to me, too highly prized among humans — and only...

Weekend Reflections: Death, the Soul, the Stars

The following pictures were taken during a recent daytrip to Tongyeong, Korea, sometimes referred to as “the Naples of Korea.” As the town is highly photogenic, these pictures do not really require any comment or explanation. Instead, therefore, I have chosen to let the images comment on or explain me, as it were. The one exception is the final picture, for which I...

Taking One Last Shot at John McCain

My morning news check turned up the headline that John McCain has decided to discontinue treatment for brain cancer, which of course means he is nearing the end, and has given up any hope of recovery.┬áImmediately, I thought, “They’ll have to shut down the internet for a few days to keep Trump’s morons from exposing their spiritual ugliness to the world.” Not surprisingly,...

Life, War, and the Fog

On November 11th, I wrote an article in honor of the men who have fought and died in defense of the principles of modern liberty. Though I was careful to stipulate that many of those men died honorably in wars that may well have been of questionable value to that cause, this, apparently, was not enough qualification for some. At American Thinker, where...